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Labour market

Theme in brief

Employment

Employment is a major source to secure the livelihood of individuals and families. It allows their participation in social life, and for many people it is an important precondition for satisfaction and a high quality of life.

The core of employment statistics at the Federal Statistical Office is employment accounts as part of national accounts and the microcensus with the labour force survey integrated into it. The employment statistics of the Federal Employment Agency provide data on employees subject to social insurance contributions.

Current

Employment accounts

43.3 million persons in employment in April 2016

In April 2016, roughly 43.3 million persons resident in Germany were in employment according to provisional calculations. Compared with the same month a year earlier, the number of persons in employment increased sharply by 548,000 or 1.3%. Roughly 1.8 million people were unemployed in April 2016, 272,000 fewer than a year earlier. 

More : 43.3 million persons in employment in April 2016 …

Positive employment trend continues in the 1st quarter of 2016

In the first quarter of 2016, the number of persons in employment whose place of employment was in Germany amounted to roughly 43.1 million according to provisional calculations. Compared with the same period a year earlier, the number of persons in employment increased considerably by 533,000 or 1.3%. This means that the positive employment trend continued at the beginning of the year. In the fourth quarter of 2015, the year-on-year increase had been somewhat smaller (+1.0%).

More : Positive employment trend continues in the 1st quarter of 2016 …

Labour force survey / microcensus

Proportion of women in executive positions unchanged at 29%

In 2014, 29% of the executive positions in Germany were held by women. Compared with the previous two years, the proportion remained nearly unchanged. In this context, Germany ranked in the lower third of all Member States of the European Union (EU). On an EU average, roughly one in three executives was a woman (33%).

More : Proportion of women in executive positions unchanged at 29% …

People in employment would like to increase their working time by 0.6 hours (current average: 35.7 hours)

This Photo shows a woman in the office (© contrastwerkstatt - Fotolia.com)

The usual weekly working hours of all persons in employment, measured as the total of main and secondary activities, amounted to an average of 35.7 hours in 2014. In purely arithmetical terms, the extra or fewer hours people wanted to work would on balance result in an increase of the weekly working time of 0.6 hours per person in employment. In this context, it was assumed that working more hours would involve higher and working less hours lower earnings.

More : People in employment would like to increase their working time by 0.6 hours (current average: 35.7 hours) …

Germany's employment rate is the second highest in the EU

This picture shows two port workers between containers (© iStockphoto.com / sanjeri)

In 2014, the employment rate of 20 to 64 year olds was 78% in Germany. Hence Germany ranked second after Sweden (80%) in the EU.

More : Germany's employment rate is the second highest in the EU …

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Commuters: infrastructure more important than petrol prices

Germany has witnessed an employment boom since 2005. This implies that an increasing number of people have to travel from home to work every day. The number of commuters has risen by approximately 11% between 2004 and 2012, an increase which is comparable to the surge in the total number of persons in employment.

How people commute depends above all on their personal housing and family situation and on the regional labour market and transport infrastructure conditions. Commuters choose a means of transport not mainly out of ecological awareness or because of rising petrol prices. The existing infrastructure, which changes only slowly over time, seems to be far more important. Many persons in employment accept the everyday reality of many commuters – be it traffic jams or packed buses and trains – because there is nothing else they can do.

The new STATmagazin informs you about current commuting structures in Germany and shows the differences of commuting in densely populated areas and in the country.

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