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Population

Migration & integration

Migration
background

German is the language largely spoken in most households with a migrant background

In most multi-person households (56%) where at least one person had a migrant background the language largely spoken was German in 2017. A person has a migrant background if he or she or at least one parent did not acquire German citizenship by birth. Based on results of the 2017 microcensus, the Federal Statistical Office (Destatis) also reports that the most common foreign language in those households was Turkish (17%), followed by Russian (15%), Polish (8%) and Arabic (7%).

More : German is the language largely spoken in most households with a migrant background …

Year-on-year increase of 4.4% in the population with a migrant background in 2017

In 2017, approximately 19.3 million people in Germany had a migrant background. Based on the results of the microcensus, the Federal Statistical Office (Destatis) also reports that this was a 4.4% increase compared with a year earlier. A person has a migrant background if he/she or at least one parent did not get German citizenship by birth.

More : Year-on-year increase of 4.4% in the population with a migrant background in 2017 …

Naturalisations

1.7% increase in naturalisations in 2017

Roughly 112,200 foreigners became naturalised German citizens in 2017. This was the highest number since 2013. The Federal Statistical Office (Destatis) also reports that this was an increase of just over 1,800, or 1.7%, compared with a year earlier.

More : 1.7% increase in naturalisations in 2017 …

Foreign
population

Delayed registrations in the Central Register of Foreigners: Addition to the press release "Foreign population increased by 5.8% in 2017"

There were roughly 585,000 people more on the Central Register of Foreigners (AZR) at the end of 2017 than at the end of 2016. However, this figure must not be interpreted as net immigration of the year 2017 as the increase also includes a considerable number of delayed registrations. Roughly 316,000 registrations and approximately 90,000 de-registrations were carried out with delay in 2017. Most of the delayed registrations (297,000 cases) were arrivals from abroad before the year 2017 which were entered in the Central Register of Foreigners only in 2017. Therefore, please consider the following when interpreting the foreign population figures from the Central Register of Foreigners:

More : Delayed registrations in the Central Register of Foreigners: Addition to the press release "Foreign population increased by 5.8% in 2017" …

Integration
indicators

Integration indicators 2005 to 2016: people with a migrant background continue to be disadvantaged

People with a migrant background continue to differ clearly from those without a migrant background in terms of education, labour market participation and income. The Federal Statistical Office (Destatis) reports that, regarding several central integration indicators, the differences between people with and without a migrant background have remained unchanged since 2005.

More : Integration indicators 2005 to 2016: people with a migrant background continue to be disadvantaged …

Persons seeking
protection

1.6 million people seeking protection in Germany at the end of 2016

On 31 December 2016, 1.6 million people seeking protection were registered in Germany. They accounted for 16% of the country's foreign population. Based on the Central Register of Foreigners (AZR), the Federal Statistical Office (Destatis) also reports that the number of people seeking protection increased by 851,000 (+113%) since the end of 2014. People seeking protection are foreigners who, referring to humanitarian reasons, are staying in Germany.

More : 1.6 million people seeking protection in Germany at the end of 2016 …

AllePressemitteilungen


A new set of data in the Genesis database regarding people seeking protection according

On 12 July 2018, Destatis published a new set of data in the Genesis database regarding people seeking protection according to the Central Register of Foreigners. This allows flexible evaluation regarding people seeking protection at the federal level (NUTS 0). This area will gradually be extended and it will also be possible to perform evaluations at the Land level (NUTS 1) and the administrative district level (NUTS 3).

The data on people seeking protection for 2007 to 2016 have been revised to coincide with the publication of the new set of data. Generally, the revision has a low impact on the numbers of cases published before. By the revision, the number of people seeking protection at the end of 2016 decreased by 5,000 cases from 1,603,000 to 1,598,000 (-0.3%).

The reason for the revision is that the data basis had to be adjusted to the legal provisions of the Freedom of Movement Act/EU. Generally, citizens of the European Economic Area (EEA), that is, the EU, Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway, do not require a visa to enter, or a residence title to stay in Germany, pursuant to Section 2 (4) of the Freedeom of Movement Act/EU. As a result of the revision, EEA citizens entitled to freedom of movement are no longer included under people seeking protection, even if they are registered in the Central Register of Foreigners as having a humanitarian residence title.

Infographic: People seeking protection

Persons seeking protection are identified in the Central Register of Foreigners based on their status under residence law. The infographics on persons seeking protection explain the approach to categorising these people by their protection status (unsettled, recognised or refused) and the major concepts used in this context.

Pfeil

Infographic: People seeking protection

Tables

Additional Information

Key Figures

Persons with a migration background201719.3 mn
Foreign population201710.6 mn
Turkey20171.5 mn
Poland2017866,855
Syria2017698,950
Persons seeking protection20161.6 mn
Syria2016454,815
Afghanistan2016190,880
Iraq2016156,455
Naturalisations2017112,211

Data on refugees

Logo: Refugees: Population

On our special page you will find information on people seeking refuge.

© Statistisches Bundesamt (Destatis), 2018

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